A walk through Ramsau

A few days before we traveled to Köln for Easter, Rosebud and I went for a walk through Ramsau. This is a small farming community not too far from our house. There’s a pleasant café there, attached to one of the barns, as well as a riding stable. The views of the surrounding countryside are amazing. On a really clear day, you can even see the Zugspitze, the highest peak in the German alps.

Behind our neighborhood there is a wooded area with a few walking/riding/biking paths.

The woods behind our house

The woods behind our house

Walking path behind our house

Walking path behind our house

There’s also a lovely stream once you reach the road toward Ramsau. The stream winds through Ramsau and past many of the farmhouses.

stream near Ramsau

stream near Ramsau


Rosebud is fascinated by water so we stood by the little waterfall for awhile.

The wildflowers were just beginning to bloom, so I snapped some pictures of them. I should buy a wildlife guidebook so I can learn about the local botany and wildlife. I think these might be related to forget-me-nots, but I’m not sure.

Purple wildflowers

Purple wildflowers

Approaching Ramsau, you can see these typical farmhouses. The building style in these barns is unique to Bavaria. I find it especially interesting that the barns are attached to the farmhouse. It makes sense, if you think about it. The farmers can easily care for their animals without having to go very far during a heavy snowfall.

Farmhouses in Ramsau

Farmhouses in Ramsau

In many Bavarian towns, you’ll see a little shrine like this one. If someone hasn’t been able to get to their local church, they can say a prayer at one of these shrines. This one has a statue of Mary and of Jesus. When I lived in the Köln region, I didn’t notice too many shrines like this. But here in Bavaria, where most families are Catholic, these little shrines dot the landscape.

Ramsau shrine

Ramsau shrine

The stable in Ramsau offers riding lessons. When my niece comes to visit, we can hopefully do some riding together. (My talented niece loves horses and she takes riding lessons in Kentucky.) When Rosebud is old enough, maybe she will also want to learn to ride.

Ramsau horse

Ramsau horse

The path we walked is actually one used by the farmers. I’ve noticed that many of the walking paths here are farm paths. Sometimes, you’ll end up walking right past the front door of the farmhouse. The farmers are used to it and don’t seem to mind.

Walking along the path

Walking along the path

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Here’s the stream again, having found its way from Ramsau.

The stream from Ramsau

The stream from Ramsau

Isn’t the countryside stunning? When I do this walk again, I think I’ll pack a lunch so Rosebud and I can sit and enjoy the view for awhile.

The surrounding countryside

The surrounding countryside

view near Ramsau

view near Ramsau

farm path near Ramsau

farm path near Ramsau

I was carrying Rosebud in my front carrier, so I was getting a little tired at this point. We sat down on a bench, and then I decided to let her sit on the ground for a few minutes. She was fascinated! She looked at everything – the blades of grass, pine needles, some wildflowers… it makes you look at the world differently when you consider how it would look from a baby’s perspective. She enjoyed playing with a pinecone, turning it over and over in her hands.

Rosebud discovers Mother Nature

Rosebud discovers Mother Nature

Rosebud observing the world around herself

Rosebud observing the world around herself

Another view of the mountains:

The Alps from Ramsau

The Alps from Ramsau

The path goes a bit further, but both Rosebud and I were tired. Next time, we will go all the way to the observation point, where you really get a good view of the whole area.

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5 responses to “A walk through Ramsau

  1. These views are gorgeous! Someday, hopefully, if I’m lucky, I’ll make it back to Europe. If I do- this is definitely one place I’d be visiting. Definitely enjoying the area through your blog and pictures! Hope all is well!

  2. I enjoyed reading your posts so far. It’s always interesting for me to learn how Germany is looked at by immigrants, because often I’m not aware of the cultural differences, even though I spent a year in the US. Anyway, I look forward to reading more posts from you. And if you have any questions concerning life in Germany, you are always welcome to ask me ;o). I’ll be happy to help you.

    • bowmansinbavaria

      I’m very thankful for your comments, and any corrections I should make! It’s nice knowing that you are reading. 🙂

  3. Mary Ann Verkamp

    Would you be open to having month-long visitors? My, what great hiking and exploring you are enjoying in such a beautiful country! You’re posts just bring back such wonderful memories, but there are a lot of places like this that I’d love to explore sometime, and so would Paul. Sometime!!!!

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